Thursday, July 24, 2014

{How to Print Large Images Using Microsoft Word}

Hey, y'all!  Tuesday I left you hanging at the end of the post without telling you what happens to Manny and the kid down the street how to tile print using Microsoft Word.  I showed you how to create large graphics using PicMonkey, but I didn't show you how to print those large images.  Today I'm giving you the full tutorial, which is easier than you may think.
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word a.k.a. How to Tile Print Using Word pitterandglink.com
 
When I made my DIY Vintage Quote Sign, I created a graphic the exact size of the board I was using.  That was great, but when it came time to print that image, which was 16" x 36", I couldn't figure out how to do it.  Yes, I Googled how to print tiled images.  I found a couple of tutorials, but the problem was that none of them used programs or versions of programs that I own.  I have Photoshop Elements, but the tutorial I found for using that program to tile print used a different version of Elements.  I have PowerPoint, but once again, the same problem.  After those fails, I was determined to figure out how to tile print using Microsoft Word.  I probably sat at the computer for two hours until I got pretty angry.  I have patience to a certain extent--I have to have patience because I teach high school students--but when I get fed up, I get angry fast.  So, yeah, I got angry.  And then the clouds parted and the sun shone down (metaphorically of course)!  I realized that I was complicating something that was pretty darn easy.  I guess that should have made me angry too, but I was just happy to have found a solution.  Here's the super simple how-to...
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
The very first step is to open a new document in Word.  **Please note that I am using Microsoft Word for Mac 2011.  If you have a different version of Word, your program may look a little different, but you should still be able to figure out the steps of the process.**  I like to work on a large image in the "Publishing Layout View," so since the screen shots are using that view, I suggest you use it as well.
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
Next you want to open the large graphic you created by choosing "Insert," "Photo," and "Picture from File."  A window will open that will allow you to choose your graphic from its file name.
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
When you open the graphic/image, it will automatically be sized to fit the page.  That defeats the whole purpose of printing a large image, so you'll need to resize the image.
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
  Under the "Format Picture" tab, change the height of the image to to its original dimensions.  If you have that little box checked next to the height and width measurements, it will automatically choose the correct width measurement.  (The checked box locks the aspect ratio, keeping the height and width ratio.)  Now you have a huge image on a white rectangle the size of computer paper.  The next step?  Print the image.  That's right.  Print the image you see on the screen.  
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
Look at your printed image and move the graphic around to print out more of the image.  The image on the left is the first part of the image I printed.  I then moved the image to where you see on the right.  You want to print out a bit of overlap so that it will be easy for you to tape your printed papers together.  Continue moving the image and printing until you get all parts of the image printed.  Tape the images together, being sure not to tape over the image because that will make it harder to trace when you begin creating your sign.  Also, you may need to trim off some of the white border around the paper to get the images to line up correctly.  It's kind of like putting together a puzzle.  :)
How to Print Large Graphics & Images Using Microsoft Word pitterandglink.com
Once you have the graphic taped together, you can follow the steps I used to make my DIY Vintage Quote Sign to make your own sign.
I hope this tutorial helps you the next time you need to print a large graphic or image for crafting purposes.  And please let me know in the comments if you have any tips for printing large images.  I love to learn new things!
RELATED POSTS:
How to Create Large Graphics Using PicMonkey
Create a Large Sign without Using a Cutting Machine

8 comments:

  1. Genius! I can't wait to see your completed sign!

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  2. Ok, Bethany, I'm back!!! Now that I was able to re-size the picture in Pic Monkey, I'm having some problems in microsoft word. I have the 2013 version so it's a little different than yours but not much. Ok, so here is where the problem lies. I am not finding a publishing layout button for lack of better technical terms. I have Read mode, Print layout and Web layout. I have tried web layout and print layout and neither one of those seem to work. It prints out one page only and it's only the corner of the image I am trying to print. You are going to regret the day you ever posted this tutorial once you are finished with me!!! LOL! I am so sorry to be a burden but obviously I am a little new at this an don't have much experience with this sort of stuff. Any help you could give is much appreciated! -Charlsey

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    1. Hey, Charlsey! No worries! I'm glad to try to help you. :) I'm not sure about how to help with the view since I don't have your version of Word. I will tell you though, that you may still be on the right track with that you're doing. When I printed my image, I printed the corner like you did. THEN I moved the image to a different section (with some overlap) and printed again. With this way of tile printing, the pieces won't print out all that the same time. You have to manipulate the image before printing each section. I hope that makes sense. :)

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  3. PC Word doesn't have a publishing layout option. If you're using a PC, there is an easy method. It took me a while but I figured it out after much frustration. Open Word and insert your picture. Right click on the image and choose "size and position" and choose the size you need. Mine was 28 x 20. The image will appear to be a partial image but your document will still only show page 1 of 1. Do not panic. (if you are using this for transferring to wood and just need an outline of the image instead of using a ton of ink - you can print just an outline of the image by rt clicking and choosing "format picture". Select "artistic Effects" and choose photocopy. This will give you just an outline. Ok...Right click again on the image and copy it. Open Windows Paint and paste it. Click on "page setup" and under 'scaling', choose "adjust to: 100% normal size" as opposed to the "fit to" button. This will insure that the image prints out on multiple sheets that you can tape together instead of fitting it to a much too small size. I'm using Word 2013 on a PC. Hope it makes sense and that it helps.

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    1. this solution worked for me! awesome now i can create my dollhouse using plans i found on the internet as a guide!

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  4. I can't seem to move the picture inside the text box, therefore I can't print the rest of my image. I've looked for other links explaining how to move the image inside the box to reveal the rest of the image but I can't find anything that works. Help???

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    1. you are inserting an image so there shouldn't be a text box. open up a new word doc, add your desired image by either inserting directly from the folder it's in or by copying it and pasting it. once image is on the page click on the image so that the "picture tools" button is highlighted at the top, then click the "format" button. Click the "text wrapping" arrow to open up the drop down menu. Then click on "in front of text" and that should allow you to move the image around. Be careful to try to keep the image aligned correctly, but play around with it until you get comfy moving it. Hope this helps!!

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  5. Ladies, THANK YOU! For all the tips and extra posts on troubleshooting above---- this is BRILLIANT! I am so grateful for your post Bethany! Finally--- the BLANK Chalkboard in my home office is getting the design it's been waiting for. Analysis Paralysis is OVER and I can now letter the board confidently with your tutorial. PRINTING my PICMONKEY design as we speak! ;)

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